Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog

“Bone Church” — THAT was pretty much all the bipeds had to say to make me agree 100% with the idea of going to Kutná Hora. Plus it’s not like it was that far from Prague, our home base in the Czech Republic. So we hopped on a train and set out.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Always power nap when you can!

Luckily, we encountered a helpful ticket master who told us that the little train that you could normally take from the main train station in Kutná Hora to the city’s old centre was not working. We would need to walk or take a public bus. This wasn’t good news since our ticket included the extra leg, but the ticket master assured us that the bus would honour it. Then he was kind enough to tell us that the Church of Bones, was in walking distance of the train station. The old centre, with its Gothic cathedral and more, on the other hand, well, that would easily be a 50-minute walk.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

The map … and bottom left how long it takes with all the transport options.

The bipeds were a little bummed. We love to walk! This was the first time that we had visited a small town with a train station so very far from the town’s centre. But no matter! We figured we’d start with what was in walking distance and take it from there. A quick stop at the little tourist office at the Kutná Hora train station armed us with a pretty darn good map. It showed the distances well so we had a clear idea of what to expect.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

A really great map! Main train station is on the far right, you can see the bone church and such close and then this BIG stretch before the old town.

Cathedral of the Assumption

We figured we would start with a quick peak at the lesser visited Cathedral of the Assumption of Our Lady and Saint John the Baptist. (Seriously? They really need to get shorter names!) The church is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, after all. But its “big sister,” the cathedral down in the old centre, totally eclipses Our Lady. But it’s totally worth a stop none the less.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

It is rather lovely!

Sedlec Ossuary

And then, much to my THRILL, we crossed the street and went up a super cute little road to find the Church of Bones — or the Sedlec Ossuary, as it is correctly called. But, total TOTAL bummer for me awaited. No dogs inside! Whaaaaaaaaat? But … but …but … .

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

I can’t go beyond this point!

I was not even allowed in the cemetery around the small church! So, the bipeds did what they always do in these situations: they did the “doggy hand-off.” Finding a really sweet little coffee shop and corner store just across the street, Mom visited the church first while Dad ordered a coffee. Mom paid for her ticket, went in, and grabbed the information sheet. These were really well done and free, so DO pick one up!

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

I’m sensing a theme….

The “Bone Church” is rather unassuming from the outside, to be honest. So I am doubly disappointed that I did not get to stare in awe at the chandeliers comprising of at least one of every bone in the human body, or the pyramids of skulls and delicately crafted shields of arms made of … yes, you guessed it, arm bones!

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

No accounting for taste really …. but I kinda like it!

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

It’s actually cool!

… And wow, creepy coat of arms!

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

The bird pulling the eyeball out … CREEPY!!

Mom was listening in on a tour guide and found out that the church is sinking. It’s literally crumbling to the ground or something like that. The whole church if off-centre now, causing all sorts of structural issues. The guide said that the church will likely be closed for a five-year restoration. “As of January — I think that is when they will close it,” the guide added.

Mom was thrilled that we were able to visit while the church was still open. As the guide pointed out, even though they plan to restore the church to exactly as it is now, with each bone carefully back in place, the centuries of dust and physical history will have been disturbed or washed away. It simply will not be the same.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

The street to the bone church and coffee house on the right!

Armed with that information, Mom went back to get Dad and let him have his go. He came back out shaking his head in disbelief at what he had seen. By now, I was right irritated at being kept out of the loop! But, life goes on. (sigh)

We headed toward the closest bus stop indicated on our map, where we waited. We don’t speak the local language and we had no idea what bus to take. so we asked by pointing at the old centre on our map and showing our train ticket until one driver just waved us to the back of the bus. Okay then!

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

DOG ont he bus! No one cares!

Old Town of Kutná Hora

To our surprise, the bus dropped us off at the old town train station, which was not working. This is the train station that would have connected to the main station. I found this odd because the old town train station is not actually right in the old centre! I mean, if you’re going to replace a non-functioning train station with a bus, why not take advantage of the change and drop people off in the old town square? But, the signs were pretty good and we had our map, so we just went with the flow.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Sign said to go this way. Looks right! Joy of fall travel NO TOURISTS!

Following our map closely, we found our way to the most romantic alley Kutná Hora has to offer: Ruthardska Street. It’s absolutely delightful as it winds its way along the former town wall.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Here is our map. The #’s will help situate you in my narrative.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Ruthardska Street is so charming!

This led us straight to the Italian Court (#5 on the map) and the Church of Saint James (#6). The Italian Court was home to the royal mint and to the king when he visited Kutná Hora. The town hall was relocated to the palace in the 18th century, and today, it houses a museum of coin minting, featuring exhibits about the silver that made Kutná Hora famous.

We learned that silver played such a huge part in the town’s prosperity that from the 13th to the 18th centuries, Kutná Hora (then called Kuttenberg) was the second most important town in Bohemia after Prague. That is no small thing! The town’s wealth funded many of the beautiful buildings we’d see on our visit. In fact, there is so much beauty in the town’s architecture that in 1995, the historic centre of Kutná Hora, in its entirety, was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

The Royal Court main entrance! Love the Tourette!

The Church of Saint James Church was built in the 17th century. It was known back in its heyday as “the tall church” for its 80-metre-tall height. It’s worth popping in for a quick look. No dogs allowed inside though, so a hand off will be needed.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

SOLID! that is the word right?

Next on our walk, was THE silver museum (#7). Yes, there are many. This one — the Czech Museum of Silver — wasn’t always a museum. It was, in fact, just part of the fortifications in the 13th century. It was later converted into a palace of sorts and then finally found its purpose as the primary museum of the silver that put Kutná Hora on the map. There are two tours. Tour 1 is about the town and its link to silver. Tour 2 is a more detailed look at the way silver was mined and what properties it had, and more. Dogs are not welcome so we skipped this part.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Do look up! Some of the best stuff is roof level.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

See what I mean?

Still making our way to the cathedral, we came upon one of the town’s most picturesque spots: the Jesuit College (#10) and the Chapel of Corpus Christi (#8). The college is an impressive three-story Baroque building with transverse wings in the shape of a reverse F. Built in 1667, it’s the Czech Republic’s second largest gallery for visual arts of the 20th and 21st centuries. Art of that era is not really our thing, so we skipped the tour. As for the chapel, it’s a simple, unassuming little thing, quite overshadowed by the cathedral. It’s Gothic by the looks of it, and it is my understanding that it was originally an ossuary, much like the Church of Bones.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

The Chapel

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

So yeah … turn around for the money shot!

Finally, we arrived at the most impressive Cathedral of St. Barbara (#9). It really is beautiful. Started in the 14th century, the cathedral is particularly delicate in its form. I found it had a certain lightness to its buttresses that reminded me to some degree – although even lighter – of the buttresses of the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Yep – she’s a beauty!

We walked around the gardens and I ran about off-leash. No one minded, and I played with another dog that happened to also be visiting from out of town. My favourite part was walking the length of the wall that separates the cathedral from the bike path that leads to the woods. I just had so much fun running up and down, listening to Mom and Dad laugh at my enthusiasm for having my own “highway.”

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Does this say Regal??

Heading back toward the centre of town, where we knew we would want to stop for a bite to eat (I heard other tummies besides my own rumbling), we went left rather than right, where we had come from. From here, we found the Stone Fountain (#11). Late Gothic in style, it’s an example of the town’s early water distribution system. A plaque says the fountain was completed in 1495 by Master Brikci.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Water for all!

By this point, we needed to speed up a little. There is a fine line where Dad goes from hungry to “hangry” and we didn’t want to risk crossing that line. So we walked quickly past the pretty Church of St. John of Nepomuk (#12).

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

But OH what a pretty town!

But we did pop our heads in at the Stone House(#13). It was on Mom’s “must-see list” so we HAD to go inside. Turns out the museum is totally small dog friendly! How cool is that! It’s a gorgeous burgher’s house – inside and out. Of course, the tour focuses mostly on silver, as do nearly all museum tours in Kutná Hora. You have two choices: Tour 1 is about the town, its silver and how it attracted the royal houses to settle there. The tour also goes into the life of the people in the 17th to 19th centuries. Tour 2 is a nice shift, focussing more on the stonemasons and their art during the medieval era of the town. That tour is well worth considering, especially if you’ve already done a tour on the silver.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

It’s rather stunning right?

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Dad and myself on the tour!

By now, hangry was settling in over Dad like a grey cloud. So we quickly walked past the Plague Column, properly known as the Column of the Virgin Mary Immaculate in memoriam of the thousands who died in the plague of 1713 (#14), and made our way to the Sankturin House (#4) where Mom and I visited the tourist information desk to figure out a way to efficiently get back to the train station. Dad went and scouted out a place for a bite to eat on the main square of the old town that the Sankturin House overlooks.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Dad and his panacota. HAPPY MAN!!

And so we settled down for a lovely meal. An enormous salad each for the bipeds and some chicken strips for me. We sat in the sun on a very warm afternoon, enjoying the quiet and sleepy vibe the town was giving off this late in the season (mid-September). I was allowed on the patio – or even indoors; they didn’t seem to care much.

After our meals, we crossed the street and grabbed a cab. It was so inexpensive, we realized that if you are more than one person, a cab is really the easiest way to travel the distance between the train station and the old centre. We made a mental note of this in case there was a next time. Our driver was fun, bright, and full of laughter. He asked all sorts of questions about me and how I travel, before dropping us off at the little train station.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Easy to find a cab on the main square.

As we waited for the train back to Prague, we looked at the photos we had taken on our devices and agreed we would go back and spend another day if time permitted. We’d love to take the long Royal Walk that follows the little river below the city and connects to a 30-kilometre bike trail through the local forests. Or hey, there is a wine bike trail too! We’d be curious to see if I’d be allowed in to visit the Museum of LEGO Building Blocks or get in my sling bag and join the bipeds for the toboggan run (The Luge)! All in all, my guess is that we may have seen the highlights but there is so very much more of Kutná Hora to discover.

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

The train station of Kutna Hora – clouds coming in as we leave. Good timing!

Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog Montecristo Travels

Heading back to Prague!

In review: Kutná Hora is much more than the bone chapel! Thanks to the town’s prosperous silver mines, Kutná Hora became the second most decadent city in the Bohemian kingdom in the Middle Ages, flourishing and rivalling Prague economically, culturally, and politically. Eventually, the silver dried up and the town was ravaged by two holy wars, but what was left behind will still wow you, Dear Reader. Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic with a dog… well just go! It’s pretty pet-friendly and absolutely worth it. For more pics visit our FB page!

40 Comments on “Visiting Kutná Hora in the Czeck Republic With a Dog

  1. I’m so sorry you didn’t get to go in. I’m taking my boyfriend there in March. So excited for him to see it. I wish I could bring our German shepherds with us, even if they had to wait outside.

    • yes – I do know one lady traveling with a shepherd… The Tropical Dog … :)

  2. You have the most amazing, beautiful adventures! Stunning photos… absolutely gorgeous! Love the power nap the most though… BOL

  3. Those pictures are stunning! I hope the restoration project works. It would be horrible to lose such a beautiful place.

    • It would be a shame… I keep wondering WHY is it sinking? If it’s just the soil how DO you fix that?

  4. I’m always so impressed with your photos and yes, a little jealous of all your travels, especially being able to take your dog along. Can wait to read about your next adventure.

    • Lots more for the Czech Republic then a bit of Vienna, Bratislava and Budapest!

  5. I remember seeing this Bone Church on TV in a motorcyle tour called ‘The Long Way Round’ by Ewan MCGregor and Charlie Borman. It looks astonishing and more than a little mad!

    • Well – I often think what will people hundreds of years from now think we were “mad” for doing … you know? It’s the fun thing about history … to see how our minds shifted from perfectly normal to not and why.

  6. Thanks for sharing your adventures and I think it is time I start again with mine. I have always been a gypsy and all of a sudden am not doing the moving around like I used to do. I have one nephew in China, Two nephews working on yachts and seeing the world and the older generation seems to be settling down LOL.
    You have got me thinking again,

    • DO IT!!!! Next on our list: Venice, more of France and Italy in general, then some Spain and Portugal … I’d like to toss in Puerto Rico while I am at it!

  7. As a long-time traveler with my dog, this is very fascinating for me. I doubt I will travel out of the US with a dog, but I love living vicariously through your travels.

  8. Oh my goodness, my dog mom and dad have been there! She really enjoyed seeing your photos! We didn’t realize, silly us, you live in Prague. Dog mom and dad were just there in November, for almost 3 weeks. Next time you will all have to meet up. Not sure I should mention this…. but dog mom is always telling me the dogs in the Czech republic are so well behaved she is dying to know how so she can get me trained… Smiles, Barks and Wagging Tails, ~Shasta (and Denise)

    • Oh we don’t live there!! We just visited. We live in Ottawa Canada!!

  9. I am so enjoying being taken along on your trip! Beautiful pics and I, too, had a long name for my elementary school – Blessed Virgin Mary Help of Christians School – a/k/a St. Mary’s Winfield! Whew! It looks like a wonderful trip, even though the train wasn’t working. Walking can be fun and you get to explore. It’s so great you can travel there by train and see so many wonderful places. Your dad’s panacota sure looks yummy!

    • I had some and I can vouch for that panacota! I DO wish Canadian trains would be pet friendly. :(

  10. oh man, if I could figure out how to travel with my 70lb best friend, I would go everywhere in the world with him! This looks like such an amazing experience!

    • Head over to The Tropical Dog!! Shark and her owner Maria ARE doing JUST that! From France to Columbia and more!

  11. That’s too bad that you weren’t allowed inside the churches. I am very familiar with the doggie hand off. That happens to me sometimes, too.

    • I just wish I could think of something for solo travellers to do ….

  12. The Bone Church is not what I expected it to be; I’m not sure what I was expecting, though. It is both disturbing and also kind of amazing in a creepy way. Whose bones are they? Enemies or friends of the church? I feel like this is way more intense than anything I’ve seen in a movie. I guess I need to google this!
    Turns out I’ve probably seen it in a movie, although I’m sure I thought it was just a set decoration. I guess real life is stranger than fiction.

    It looks like you had a great trip!

    • they are the bones of locals killed in many wars. The church and area was flooded the cemetery flooded and all the bones “floated” … so one man lovingly did this in respect of the dead.

    • We love architecture! It’s why we favour Europe … well among SO many other reason (hint: FOOD!)

  13. As always, your pictures are stunning and your post makes me long to hit the road for a travel adventure. That church looks fascinating – a little odd but truly interesting. I am only partially joking when I say (beg), “TAKE ME WITH YOU NEXT TIME!” 😉

    • Hey … anytime! If you need big dog travel tips head over to The Tropical Dog … and we will meet you there!

    • Yeah – I was pretty damn bummed. *sigh* The smells!! can you imagine??

  14. Simply in love with all the pictures. Got to see some splendid architecture. Its always a joy to read your furry friends adventures, it is a shame that they did not let you take him in

    • yeah – well you win some you loose some! In a way it’s good … it narrows things down and we see SO much still.

  15. Pingback: Visiting Konopiště Castle with a Small Dog

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